Dental Patients with Special Needs

FDA President Dr. Ralph Attanasi and Today’s FDA have partnered to bring you a special video to correspond with his column, “@ralph,” in each issue. The Sept/Oct issue focuses on special needs, and in the video below, Dr. Attanasi provides tips for preparing and caring for dental patients with special needs. We encourage our members to share your experiences with us by sending your story to communications@floridadental.org for potential future posts to Beyond the Bite.

The Special Needs Dental Patient from Florida Dental Association on Vimeo.

Licenses, Licenses and More Licenses

By Graham Nicol, Esq., Health Care Risk Manager, Board Certified Specialist (Health Law)

I have a valid dental license in the state of Florida — that’s all I need to practice here, right? Wrong. As just one example: you’ll also need an occupational license — maybe even more than one! Occupational licenses are required by county ordinance and city regulations, not state law. Any business operating within city limits may have to get a county license as well as a city license.

Not feeling the love? It gets worse, ‘cause you’ll also need a Federal Employer Identification Number (FEIN) — kind of like a social security number, but for a corporation instead of a natural person — and a National Provider Identification number (NPI).

You see, all four levels of government want to regulate you to protect the public from unsavory characters. Unfortunately, the only way government can keep these nasty people off the streets is to charge each licensee an annual fee for the privilege of practicing your chosen profession and feeding your family.

So, don’t forget: Get all your licenses and keep all branches of government well-funded.

This blog is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional legal advice. If you have a specific concern or need legal advice regarding your dental practice, you should contact a qualified attorney.

My Email Has Been Hacked … Now What Do I Do?

By Larry Darnell, FDA Director of Information Systems

First, do not freak out — email hacks are quite common. Determine if it is just your email that has been hacked and not your computer. If the computer you work on the most is not showing any signs of trouble (pop-ups, browser redirects, etc.), then it is likely that only your email account has been hacked.

Log in to your email and change your password immediately and try to update to a two-step (or two-factor) authentication password method. This will keep individuals from seizing your account so easily in the future. I also would recommend that you change any other passwords that are based on your email password. Most people use a variation of one password for life; thus, the name life password. After you have done that, email, text or call your contacts and let them know your email has been hacked and not to open anything from you.

 

Help Protect Your Retirement Security

By FDA Services

Long-term care is the inability to care for one’s self due to an illness, injury or disability. This care provides assistance with daily living activities and is provided in a variety of settings, including in-home care. The need for long-term care can last for a few months to many years.

Long-term care for an individual can cost from $60,000 to more than $100,000 per year. These costs can severely disrupt the financial security of affected families. Private health insurance and Medicare are not intended to pay for long-term care. Long-term care insurance is becoming a popular way to protect against financial hardship when the need arises.

Make sure you have a plan for you and your family. Call FDA Services at 800.877.7597 to learn about long-term care insurance or go to http://www.completelongtermcare.com/assoc/fda.aspx.