Two FREE Online Courses: Tobacco and Nicotine Products and Addiction

Below are two FREE online continuing education (CE) courses from The Proctor & Gamble Company written by American Dental Association (ADA) member Dr. Nevin Zablotsky. Given COVID-19’s impact on the respiratory system, this information is timely.

Tobacco and Nicotine Products: The Times They Are A’Changing (1 CE hr)
The use of tobacco and its byproducts stems back to more than 5,000 B.C. Over time, we’ve found that these products are highly addictive and cause numerous serious health problems to those who use them. Given the devastation that tobacco use has caused, the tobacco industry has been forced since the 1960s and 70s to try to find ways to get the consumers of their products to switch to those that are less harmful. There have been many iterations of tobacco harm reduction over the years, with the latest being e-cigarettes and now heat-not-burn products. This course will help provide the needed knowledge to help understand how we got to the present dilemma we face as a society with these products and where we may be going to undo the damage done.


Tobacco 101: A Guide to Working with Nicotine Addicted Patients (3 CE hrs)
The course is a more thorough review of tobacco and nicotine products and how they impact oral health. There is a review of addiction with an emphasis on nicotine addiction, and a discussion of smoking cessation modalities that are currently available. This course will provide an understanding of how tobacco products impact your patients and educate you on how to confidently guide your tobacco- and nicotine-using patients to quit their addiction and the proper resources available to them.

 

About Dr. Nevin Zablotsky
Dr. Zablotsky was a periodontist for more than 40 years and treated many patients who were addicted to various tobacco and nicotine products. He saw firsthand the impact of using these addictive products on their oral and overall health. Sadly, some suffered from chronic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular compromises and strokes, COPD, lung and oral cancer. In 2001, he was part of a program funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to educate dental offices in Vermont on the impact of these products on their patients. This led to his second career as a lecturer on this subject throughout the U.S and internationally, as well as for the ADA. Over the past six years, he’s been consulting and lecturing at Nova Southeastern University College of Dental Medicine.

 

 

 

 

What They Don’t Teach in Dental School

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By Mr. Casey Hiers, FDC2019 Speaker

Dentistry is a unique and challenging occupation. The variety, flexibility and income potential associated with being a dentist or specialist is second to none. What most dentists don’t see coming and receive little to no training on is the business side of dentistry. A practice owner can bear the workload of multiple C-level executives, on top of providing great dentistry. This can cause a dentist to spend many late nights pouring into the business side of their practice. Too many dentists feel like they are on a hamster wheel or on an island with no one to talk to and no end in sight. Is this the best use of your time? Is this what you went to dental school for?

The No. 1 challenge in dentistry today is the business side. A dentist makes the most impact treating patients, not analyzing QuickBooks, accounting strategies, cash flow reports, etc. Making sure the proper systems and processes for your specific practice are in place to maximize your income and retirement savings is paramount.

We worked with a dentist in Texas who was just winging it when it came to the business/finance side of their practice. They struggled with insurance, income structure, retirement savings, overhead and poor tax management. They felt they were taking one step forward and two steps back. If you want an example of what getting your financial house in order looks like, then this before and after snapshot will be worth a glance. Their income went from $196,500 to $322,700 in 2 ½ years. Retirement savings went from $0 to $64,050 in that same time frame. Those are just the financial benefits. The emotional relief that comes with mastering the business side of your practice is priceless. Another example is a dentist from Florida. They were gifted clinically, adored by their patients and extremely busy. They didn’t mind the business side, but always felt like they could be doing better. Their income went from $177,106 to $318,033 and retirement savings from $14,041 to $104,023 in two years. Overhead decreased 12%, but the biggest improvement in their eyes was no more tax surprises from Uncle Sam.

Attending this course could be the difference between being financially free to retire in your 50s or worrying that your hands, neck or back will give out before you are able to retire on your terms.

Mr. Hiers’ course, “What They Don’t Teach in Dental School — The Business Side” (NC04) will be on Thursday, June 27 from 9:30-11:30 a.m. Make sure to register for this course today — only 30 seats left! Go to floridadentalconvention.com to register.

REMINDER: Mandatory Opioid Course Deadline is Thursday, Jan. 31!

The deadline to take the mandatory opioid course to maintain your dental license is this Thursday, Jan. 31! Go to floridadental.org/opioidcourse to register and take this course.

Per HB 21, each person registered with the DEA and authorized to prescribe controlled substances shall complete a board-approved two-hour continuing education course on prescribing controlled substances by Jan. 31, 2019.

You MUST indicate whether you are registered with the DEA to prescribe controlled substances through the Florida Department of Health. This is the only way the BOD will know if you are required to take the mandatory opioid course. *The BOD automatically assumes you are registered with the DEA and must take the mandatory course if you do not indicate otherwise.*

For more information on HB 21 and its requirements, go to floridadental.org/opioidlaw.

REMINDER: Indicate Your Status with the U.S. DEA with the Florida Department of Health

All Florida-licensed dentists must indicate whether you are registered with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to prescribe controlled substances through the Florida Department of Health. This is the only way the Florida Board of Dentistry (BOD) will know if you are required to take the mandatory opioid course. The BOD automatically assumes you are registered with the U.S. DEA and must take the mandatory opioid course if you do not indicate otherwise. Click here for instructions on how to indicate if you are/are not registered with the U.S. DEA.

For more information on HB 21 and its requirements, go to floridadental.org/opioidlaw.