FDA President Dr. Rudy Liddell Advises Governor’s Task Force

COVID19_update_liddell appointment_facebook

[FDA President Dr. Rudy] “Liddell, addressing the Agriculture, Finance, Government, Healthcare, Management and Professional Services committee, pushed for dentists to be considered ‘essential’ so they can get the Personal Protective Equipment, such as N95 masks, that is necessary for a timely and safe re-opening.”

To hear a recording of Dr. Liddell’s address to the task force, go to soundcloud.com/user-401731049-…/florida-governors-task-group. (Audio begins at 0:11.)

To read an article regarding his address, go to floridapolitics.com/archives/329743-covid19-dentists.

Two FREE Online Courses: Tobacco and Nicotine Products and Addiction

Below are two FREE online continuing education (CE) courses from The Proctor & Gamble Company written by American Dental Association (ADA) member Dr. Nevin Zablotsky. Given COVID-19’s impact on the respiratory system, this information is timely.

Tobacco and Nicotine Products: The Times They Are A’Changing (1 CE hr)
The use of tobacco and its byproducts stems back to more than 5,000 B.C. Over time, we’ve found that these products are highly addictive and cause numerous serious health problems to those who use them. Given the devastation that tobacco use has caused, the tobacco industry has been forced since the 1960s and 70s to try to find ways to get the consumers of their products to switch to those that are less harmful. There have been many iterations of tobacco harm reduction over the years, with the latest being e-cigarettes and now heat-not-burn products. This course will help provide the needed knowledge to help understand how we got to the present dilemma we face as a society with these products and where we may be going to undo the damage done.


Tobacco 101: A Guide to Working with Nicotine Addicted Patients (3 CE hrs)
The course is a more thorough review of tobacco and nicotine products and how they impact oral health. There is a review of addiction with an emphasis on nicotine addiction, and a discussion of smoking cessation modalities that are currently available. This course will provide an understanding of how tobacco products impact your patients and educate you on how to confidently guide your tobacco- and nicotine-using patients to quit their addiction and the proper resources available to them.

 

About Dr. Nevin Zablotsky
Dr. Zablotsky was a periodontist for more than 40 years and treated many patients who were addicted to various tobacco and nicotine products. He saw firsthand the impact of using these addictive products on their oral and overall health. Sadly, some suffered from chronic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular compromises and strokes, COPD, lung and oral cancer. In 2001, he was part of a program funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to educate dental offices in Vermont on the impact of these products on their patients. This led to his second career as a lecturer on this subject throughout the U.S and internationally, as well as for the ADA. Over the past six years, he’s been consulting and lecturing at Nova Southeastern University College of Dental Medicine.

 

 

 

 

Who’s Zooming Who?

By Larry Darnell, FDA Director of Information Systems

The title refers to an Aretha Franklin song and the first time I heard it, I struggled to understand what that even means (it refers to checking someone out). Now it has a new meaning. I remember just a month ago, the FDA Board of Trustees had their first Zoom video call. It seemed like such a novelty then — almost like watching a Brady Bunch intro with squares of talking heads. Little did we know then that this novel way of communicating would now become the standard for so many of us.

In the last month, so much has changed thanks to COVID-19 and our response to it. The saving grace for us is that our technology is up to the task in most cases. My daughter needed to see a doctor for a minor illness. Thanks to telehealth, she “saw” the doctor and got a prescription called in the same day. My wife is a teacher and she has at least weekly and sometimes daily video interaction with her students via technology. I’ve even attended church services virtually through Facebook Live. A different world indeed.

This year, we had a few employees at the FDA who could work remotely. Now, everyone is setup with that ability. It’s a challenge to work remotely, but at least we have that option. There are a few things to remember in this new Zoom Age we’re in now.

First, remember to communicate with others. While social distancing may be around for a while, communication is still essential. I admit, despite my technology background, I like face-to-face communications better. There are so many obvious physical and non-verbal cues you can pick up on in person that are missed when the contact is virtual. However, we have to now relearn the art of communicating intent through texts, emails, phone calls and even through video sessions. Communication now is intentional and likely requires more effort, but do not cease to do it. When communication ceases, people are left to doubt, question and become fearful. Be honest, kind and as positive as you can be.

Secondly, get to those projects that have been “when I get around to it” things. For me, that means clean up my email inbox, organize our shared company file system and review our websites. I do these when they become emergencies, but seldom think of them when other things are happening. It allows you to stay productive and prepare for the time when we’re able to return to our new normal.

And lastly, do not lose your spirit of volunteerism. Dentists are caring and giving people. It saddens me that the Florida Mission of Mercy was postponed, but it was the only option. There are so many other ways you can volunteer. People still have needs. I’m helping my wife’s teacher friends with technology. I’m advising churches who are forced to go online how best to do it. I am assisting my daughters’ friends who now take all college classes online. I’m using my gifts to benefit others. I’ve always wanted to help others, and I’m not going to let COVID-19 stop me from doing just that.