REMINDER: Indicate Your Status with the U.S. DEA with the Florida Department of Health

All Florida-licensed dentists must indicate whether you are registered with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to prescribe controlled substances through the Florida Department of Health. This is the only way the Florida Board of Dentistry (BOD) will know if you are required to take the mandatory opioid course. The BOD automatically assumes you are registered with the U.S. DEA and must take the mandatory opioid course if you do not indicate otherwise. Click here for instructions on how to indicate if you are/are not registered with the U.S. DEA.

For more information on HB 21 and its requirements, go to floridadental.org/opioidlaw.

REMINDER: Register With E-FORCSE!

As of  July 1, 2018, if you write a prescription for a Schedule II, III, IV and V controlled substance for a patient 16 years old or older, you (or your designee) must first check the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) Database known as E-FORCSE, (Electronic-Florida Online Reporting of Controlled Substance Evaluation Program), which is administered through the Department of Health. Click here to register for E-FORCSE. If you need any technical assistance with E-FORCSE, please contact E-FORCSE directly at at 850.245.4794 or e-forcse@flhealth.gov.

For more information on HB 21 and its requirements, go to floridadental.org/opioidlaw.

Don’t Forget: Mandatory Opioid Course Deadline is Jan. 31, 2019!

Per House Bill 21 (HB 21), all Florida licensed dentists registered with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and authorized to prescribe controlled substances shall complete a board-approved two-hour continuing education (CE) course on prescribing controlled substances by Jan. 31, 2019.

The Florida Dental Association (FDA) is recommending that member dentists take the two-hour mandatory opioid course through the Florida Medical Association (FMA) or call your local component/affiliate to see if they will be offering an in-person course. For the online FMA course, click here to register and take this course. The FMA will automatically report your credit to CE Broker on your behalf. This course must be completed by Jan. 31, 2019 to maintain your dental license.

In addition, ALL dentists must indicate within their account with the Florida Department of Health if they are/are not registered with the DEA. Click here for instructions on how to do this. Anyone who doesn’t indicate their status with the DEA will be assumed as registered and therefore must meet the new mandatory CE requirement.

For more information on HB 21 and its requirements, go to floridadental.org/opioidlaw.

FDC2018 Speaker Preview

21st Century Laser-assisted Dentistry

By Dr. Anthony Cardoza

Over the last 29 years, I have witnessed many technological advances in dentistry. Some of these advances have included computers throughout the office, digital X-rays, digital intra-oral photography, loupe and microscope magnification, and CAD/CAM technology, just to name a few. One of the most significant technological advances has been the evolution of the dental laser, and it’s this technology that’s really firing my passion for dentistry.

Lasers have been used in dentistry for several decades, but during the last five years they have become widely accepted and now tens of thousands of dentists in the U.S. and around the world have implemented lasers. Market acceptance of dental lasers is rapidly growing at a level where digital imaging was five to seven years ago.

In my practice we have several lasers for both hard- and soft-tissue applications, which are used for a wide range of procedures. It’s well-established that different procedures require different laser wavelengths. Wavelength is important because specific body tissues (chromophores) interact in different ways depending on the laser source. Therefore, it’s important to use the proper wavelength that is tissue-specific for the procedure.

The following are a few of the laser procedures performed in our office every day and the clinical advantages they offer our practice and, most importantly, our patients.

The near infrared diode laser has become my laser of choice for hygiene and soft tissue. It’s extremely effective for hygiene procedures such as laser bacterial reduction (LBR) and laser de-epitheliazation during scaling and root planing. Additionally, it’s excellent for soft-tissue surgical procedures such as frenectomy, gingivectomy, fibroma removal, and gingival retraction for crown and bridge impressions.

The most versatile laser I have is the erbium mid-infrared wavelength hard/soft-tissue laser. I use this laser several times a day for no-shot, no-drill cavity preps. My patients love being able to avoid having shots and post-op numbness. This laser gives me the ability to quickly and effectively remove decay, and often these restorations weren’t scheduled, but discovered during hygiene examinations. We can complete these procedures in one appointment and avoid the inconvenience of rescheduling the patient. With my erbium laser I can perform these procedures fast and often without anesthesia.

In addition, by lengthening the pulse duration, I also can perform many soft-tissue and bone procedures. Procedures like apicoectomy, gingivectomy, osseous recontouring and laser periodontal surgery are examples of treatments performed with the erbium laser.

Finally, lasers are now being used during endodontic treatment in the form of laser activated irrigation to greatly reduce bacteria and debris found in the canals without a net thermal elevation within the canal. Lasers also are now being used for snore reduction. The role of lasers in dentistry is continuing to increase as we see ongoing research in both lasers and their use in various applications in dentistry. The decision is no longer whether to add a laser to your practice, it’s just a matter of which laser will best fulfill your needs.

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Cordoza Photo (3)

Cordoza Photo (2)

 

Dr. Cardoza will be speaking at the 2018 Florida Dental Convention in Orlando in June. On Thursday, June 21, “Dispelling the ‘CSI Effect’ Myth” will be at 9 a.m., and “Dentistry’s Role in the Mass Disaster Scenario, Child Abuse and Intimate Partner Violence Recognition,” will be at 2 p.m. later that same day. On Friday, June 22, his workshop, “21st Century Laser-assisted Dentistry” will be at 9 a.m. with a repeat of the workshop at 2 p.m. To register, go to floridadentalconvention.com.