FDC2018 Speaker Preview

21st Century Laser-assisted Dentistry

By Dr. Anthony Cardoza

Over the last 29 years, I have witnessed many technological advances in dentistry. Some of these advances have included computers throughout the office, digital X-rays, digital intra-oral photography, loupe and microscope magnification, and CAD/CAM technology, just to name a few. One of the most significant technological advances has been the evolution of the dental laser, and it’s this technology that’s really firing my passion for dentistry.

Lasers have been used in dentistry for several decades, but during the last five years they have become widely accepted and now tens of thousands of dentists in the U.S. and around the world have implemented lasers. Market acceptance of dental lasers is rapidly growing at a level where digital imaging was five to seven years ago.

In my practice we have several lasers for both hard- and soft-tissue applications, which are used for a wide range of procedures. It’s well-established that different procedures require different laser wavelengths. Wavelength is important because specific body tissues (chromophores) interact in different ways depending on the laser source. Therefore, it’s important to use the proper wavelength that is tissue-specific for the procedure.

The following are a few of the laser procedures performed in our office every day and the clinical advantages they offer our practice and, most importantly, our patients.

The near infrared diode laser has become my laser of choice for hygiene and soft tissue. It’s extremely effective for hygiene procedures such as laser bacterial reduction (LBR) and laser de-epitheliazation during scaling and root planing. Additionally, it’s excellent for soft-tissue surgical procedures such as frenectomy, gingivectomy, fibroma removal, and gingival retraction for crown and bridge impressions.

The most versatile laser I have is the erbium mid-infrared wavelength hard/soft-tissue laser. I use this laser several times a day for no-shot, no-drill cavity preps. My patients love being able to avoid having shots and post-op numbness. This laser gives me the ability to quickly and effectively remove decay, and often these restorations weren’t scheduled, but discovered during hygiene examinations. We can complete these procedures in one appointment and avoid the inconvenience of rescheduling the patient. With my erbium laser I can perform these procedures fast and often without anesthesia.

In addition, by lengthening the pulse duration, I also can perform many soft-tissue and bone procedures. Procedures like apicoectomy, gingivectomy, osseous recontouring and laser periodontal surgery are examples of treatments performed with the erbium laser.

Finally, lasers are now being used during endodontic treatment in the form of laser activated irrigation to greatly reduce bacteria and debris found in the canals without a net thermal elevation within the canal. Lasers also are now being used for snore reduction. The role of lasers in dentistry is continuing to increase as we see ongoing research in both lasers and their use in various applications in dentistry. The decision is no longer whether to add a laser to your practice, it’s just a matter of which laser will best fulfill your needs.

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Dr. Cardoza will be speaking at the 2018 Florida Dental Convention in Orlando in June. On Thursday, June 21, “Dispelling the ‘CSI Effect’ Myth” will be at 9 a.m., and “Dentistry’s Role in the Mass Disaster Scenario, Child Abuse and Intimate Partner Violence Recognition,” will be at 2 p.m. later that same day. On Friday, June 22, his workshop, “21st Century Laser-assisted Dentistry” will be at 9 a.m. with a repeat of the workshop at 2 p.m. To register, go to floridadentalconvention.com.

 

Chew on This! 32 Questions with Dr. Joseph Pechter

Filmed in a single shot, the FDA asks intriguing people what they like, what they don’t and that fascinating middle ground that defines them.

During the South Florida District Dental Association’s annual business meeting, we switched things up and asked our questions in front of an audience. Watch the video below to find out what apps Dr. Joseph Pechter created.

Interested in taking part in “Chew on This! 32 Questions” or know someone who would make a great subject? Please send suggestions to communications@floridadental.org — we’d love to hear from our members!

Chew on This! with ADA Executive Director Dr. Kathy O’Loughlin

Filmed in a single shot, the FDA asks intriguing people what they like, what they don’t and that fascinating middle ground that defines them.

While we were in Chicago for the American Dental Association (ADA) Conference on Membership, we visited ADA Executive Director Dr. Kathy O’Loughlin to ask her some questions.

Watch the video below to find out what the superpower she’d like to have and her biggest fear have in common.

32 Questions with ADA Executive Director Dr. Kathy O’Loughlin from Florida Dental Association on Vimeo.

Altering Dental Records Can Result in Significant Penalties

By Jon M. Pellett, JD, Managing Attorney – Administrative Defense, Medical Investigation Defense Unit, The Doctors Company

The Florida Board of Dentistry (BOD) takes a dim view of those who alter dental records. If a licensee is found to have altered a dental record, the BOD has a full range of penalties available to address the violation, including loss of the dental license and significant monetary penalties.

The Florida Department of Health (DOH) is the agency charged with investigating and prosecuting violations of the Dental Practice Act, including the issue of whether dental records have been altered in violation of the requirements of the BOD. The DOH has a wide range of statutory violations to choose from when presented with altered dental records.

Under the BOD’s Rule 64B5-13.005(3), if the DOH believes the alteration of the dental record was intentional and constituted fraud or making a false or fraudulent representation, it will seek a minimum mandatory fine not to exceed $10,000 for each count or separate offense, in addition to any other penalties outlined in the Board’s disciplinary guidelines.

Typical charges for altering the dental record include the following possible violations and subsequent penalties:

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Most professional licensing boards view altered records as evidence of a fundamental character flaw in the licensee and they will seek the higher range of penalties including suspension and loss of the license. The BOD is no different.  

Although permittable, if you need to make a late entry in the dental record, to avoid any allegation that you are seeking to alter the dental record, you should follow the BOD’s rule on record keeping. Rule 64B5-17.002(2) states: “Record Alterations: Any additions, corrections, modifications, annotations or alterations (hereinafter ‘change’) to the original dental record entry must be clearly noted as such and must include the date when the change was made, must be initialed by the person making the change, and must have an explanation for the change. An original entry to the record cannot be partially or wholly removed. Rather, to represent the deletion of a record entry, the entry must be struck through where it will remain legible. A change made on the same date of the original entry must also include the time of change.”

This requirement is applicable to handwritten records and electronic records. If you have any doubts before you make alterations or changes to a dental record, consult with an attorney.

 

Reprinted with permission. ©2018 The Doctors Company. For more patient safety articles and practice tips, visit www.thedoctors.com/patientsafety.

The guidelines suggested here are not rules, do not constitute legal advice, and do not ensure a successful outcome. The ultimate decision regarding the appropriateness of any treatment must be made by each health care provider in light of all circumstances prevailing in the individual situation and in accordance with the laws of the jurisdiction in which the care is rendered.