Book Review: Noncarious Cervical Lesions and Cervical Dentin Hypersensitivity: Etiology, Diagnosis and Treatment

By Dr. Virginia McKenzie Melmed

Noncarious cervical lesions (NCCLs) and cervical dentin hypersensitivity (CDH) affect more people than caries and periodontal disease in most high-income countries.  In private practice, clinicians often focus on treating the symptoms associated with these conditions, rather than address the etiologies. In Noncarious Cervical Lesions and Cervical Dentin Hypersensitivity: Etiology, Diagnosis and Treatment, Doctors Paulo V. Sores and John O. Grippo combine their clinical experience and all relevant research to dive into every aspect of NCCLs and CDH and prove the etiologies must be understood to treat these conditions successfully.  After reading this book, the dental clinician will be able to identify and understand the etiology of NCCLs and CDH, so he can stop its progression and treat it successfully.

Noncarious Cervical Lesions and Cervical Dentin Hypersensitivity is divided into three sections:  Introduction, Mechanisms of Action, and Diagnosis and Treatment.  Section I provides the necessary historical background and prevalence data of NCCLs and CDH and explores the specific characteristics of tooth anatomy that make a tooth’s cervical region less resistant to the mechanisms of stress, friction and biocorrosion. The formation of NCCLs is multifactorial, so Section II devotes a chapter to each one of the mechanisms of etiology (stress, friction and biocorrosion), explaining how each mechanism contributes to the development of NCCLs and the effects of these mechanisms working in combination.  The chapter on biocorrosion discusses which patients are considered high risk for developing NCCLs and CDH.

After providing a thorough background into the etiology of NCCLs in Sections I and II, Section III provides the reader with detailed information into the morphological characteristics of the lesions and proposes a new classification of NCCLs to aid in identifying the etiologic factors and determining the appropriate treatment. Nonrestorative protocols of occlusal, chemical, and laser therapies are described in detail, as well as when each of these therapies is indicated. Step-by-step restorative protocols of composite bonding and indirect restorations are thoroughly explained and dental materials recommended for NCCL restorations (Table 9-2) are provided. The textbook concludes with a chapter devoted to surgical protocols, where the severity of the recession defect determines the treatment approach.

When a condition is so often observed in dental practice, it must be addressed.  With this textbook, Doctors Soarer and Grippo provide everything a dental clinician needs to know on the focused topic of non carious cervical lesions and cervical dentin hypersensitivity.  The chapters are logically organized.  The chosen illustrations are beautiful photographs or easy-to-read tables with captions that provide clarity to the illustrations and text.  The end of each chapter contains a purple conclusion box, which highlights the most important concepts from that chapter.  This book is informative, easy-to-understand, and research-based.  I would recommend this book to any dental student, practicing dental clinician, and researcher.

Book Review — Lit: The Simple Protocol for Dental Photography in the Age of Social Media

Reviewed by Dr. Kimberly Tran-Nguyen

Dr. Miguel Ortiz is a well-known prosthodontist, lecturer and photographer in the dental world. He created a book to complement the courses he teaches regarding dental photography. In the age of social media, dental photography plays a crucial role if dental practitioners want to expand their practice. What makes this textbook valuable is the knowledge Dr. Ortiz brings with his experience as a previous lab technician, dental clinician and having established a well-known social media presence.

“Lit” is broken down into simplified analogies with visual representations to better explain the concepts in the book. The author organizes the first section of the book into five concepts associated with photography that can be adjusted to produce the photos desired: exposure, aperture, shutter speed, depth of field and white balance.

Visit floridadental.org/member-center/publications/book-reviews to read the full review.

Book Review: Protocols for Mobile Dental Photography with Auxiliary Lighting

Reviewed by Dr. John Paul

Generally, I am not a fan of an infomercial and a great deal of this book revolves around how to use a proprietary device, the Smile Light MDP, with your own cell phone to make dental photographs.

That knee-jerk reaction out of the way, it is possible there is no device similar to the Smile Light MDP available and the book does a fair-handed job of comparing dental photography using a conventional digital camera and all of its attendant gear to making those photographs with your cell phone, the MDP device and a few other pieces of kit, the mirrors and retractors needed for either type means of capturing the images.

Visit floridadental.org/member-center/publications/book-reviews to read the full review.

Book Review: Protocols for Mobile Dental Photography with Auxiliary Lighting

Reviewed by Dr. John Paul

Generally, I am not a fan of an infomercial and a great deal of this book revolves around how to use a proprietary device, the Smile Light MDP, with your own cell phone to make dental photographs.

That knee-jerk reaction out of the way, it is possible there is no device similar to the Smile Light MDP available and the book does a fair-handed job of comparing dental photography using a conventional digital camera and all of its attendant gear to making those photographs with your cell phone, the MDP device and a few other pieces of kit, the mirrors and retractors needed for either type means of capturing the images.

Visit floridadental.org/member-center/publications/book-reviews to read the full review.