Reducing Aligner Challenges and Increasing Patient Compliance

By Dr. Payam Ataii

A Case Study Using the Propel System® with Invisalign®

In the following case study (Figs. 1a and 1b) I used the Propel System® (Propel Orthodontics) in conjunction with Invisalign® clear aligner therapy (Align Technology) (Fig. 2). Through a scientifically proven, patented process called micro-osteoperforation, the Propel System® stimulates the alveolar bone to induce an inflammatory response, accelerating tooth movement in the treated areas — 50-60 percent faster movement when compared to traditional orthodontics alone1 (Fig. 3). As a result, I was able to intercept an Invisalign® case that was not tracking properly by using Propel in order to get the case back on track. Using Propel helped ensure that all challenging orthodontic movements were achieved as planned avoiding additional treatment time, patient inconvenience and cost (Fig. 4). The patient could resume treatment with her current aligners once the case went through a refinement process (Fig. 5).

During my presentation at the Florida Dental Convention (FDC) this June, I will review clinical factors such as clinician experience, patient compliance, attachment engagement and interproximal reduction accuracy using cutting-edge technology such as the Propel System®. In my opinion, the Propel system is a powerful tool to help recover the aligner protocol and finish with beautiful results on challenging cases.

Dr. Ataii will be speaking at FDC2016 on June 18. His course, “Using Micro-osteoperforations to Increase and Accelerate Aligner Cases for General Practice,” will be at 2 p.m. For questions or support in Florida, contact Jim Sieg at jsieg@propelortho.com.

(To view the photos below, click to enlarge each image.)

Figure 1A
Fig. 1a

Figure 1B
Fig. 1b

Figure 2
Fig. 2

Figure 3
Fig. 3

Figure 4
Fig. 4

Figure 5
Fig. 5       

 

1 Alikhani M, Raptis M, Zoldan B, Sangsuwon C, Lee YB, Alyami B, Corpodian C, Barrera LM, Alansari S, Khoo E, Teixeira C. Effect of micro-osteoperforations on the rate of tooth movement. Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2013; 144 (5):639-648.



​​​​


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s